Dion Waiters Is The Heart And Soul Of The Miami Heat

Earlier this week, several reports were stating that Dion Waiters decided to re-sign with the Miami Heat. In fact, according to ESPN, ” Dion Waiters has agreed to terms on a four-year, $52 million deal to return to the Miami Heat”. Although people are lamenting that the team had to settle for Waiters after missing out on Gordon Hayward; one could argue that Waiters is the perfect complement to Goran Dragic.

Throughout last NBA season, the Miami Heat incorporated an offensive system centered around the pick and roll. For instance, Goran Dragic or Dion Waiters is supposed to bring the ball up to the three-point line and then a big man would set a screen. Once the pick was set Dragic or Waiters would pay attention to his defender to determine the next course of action, for instance, if the defender went under the screen, Dragic or Waiters would go over it and take the wide-open shot. On the other hand, if the defender went over the screen, Dragic or Waiters would go over it as well and drive towards the basket where he would score or pass the ball to the player next to him or to the perimeter depending on whether he was double teamed or not.

Unfortunately, there were many possessions where Goran Dragic would choose to become a spot up shooter instead of attacking the basket. For instance, he brings the ball up to the three-point shot and proceeds to pass the ball to Waiters; once that happens, he stays in the same spot or goes to one of the corners to wait for the ball to get back to him and shoot it possibly. On the other hand, there are some possessions where he shoots the ball before the big man even begins to set the screen.

Due to this, re-signing Dion Waiters was vital for the Miami Heat because he is willing and capable of going into attack mode when Dragic doesn’t want to. For instance, whenever Dion receives the ball, he will call for the screen. Once the pick was set Dragic or Waiters would pay attention to his defender to determine the next course of action, for instance, if the defender went under the screen, Dragic or Waiters would go over it and take the wide-open shot. On the other hand, if the defender went over the screen, Dragic or Waiters would go over it as well and drive towards the basket where he would score or pass the ball to the player next to him or to the perimeter depending on whether he was double teamed or not. However, on occasion, he will try to get around the defender without a screen by using his speed but if he can’t; Waiters will hop back and shoot a step back jumper.

In conclusion, Dion Waiters can be described as the heart and soul as well as the engine of the Miami Heat.

Impact Wrestling Is Mishandling The Grand Championship 

Over the past nine months, Impact Wrestling  has used the grand championship as an opportunity to capitalize on the popularity of mixed martial arts. The idea behind this new belt/division was to introduce a new match style to fans where wrestlers would compete under MMA style rules. This contest consists of three separate rounds with a three-minute time limit per round and a ten point must scoring system. While the company has managed to copy the format of an MMA bout successfully, they continue to overlook one aspect that was vital to the success of the sport. The majority of contest in MMA are nontitle fights between two fighters in a particular division. The system allows a fighter to earn a title shot by defeating multiple people in the division over the course of several bouts. Furthermore, it allows fans to follow a fighters trajectory which makes it easier to understand how they earned the number one contender spot. Unfortunately, Impact has ignored that system as they have been giving title shots to wrestlers who haven’t earned it. For example, Impact management gave Marshe Rockett a title shot because he asked their champion “Moose” for one on social media.

Therefore if Impact Wrestling wants to make the grand championship a staple of their organization, they need to figure out a system where wrestlers can go about earning a title shot. As a result, I suggest that the company create a ten man tournament to develop a ranking system where a wrestler’s ranking would be based on when he is eliminated. For instance, if a wrestler won the tournament he would get the next title shot but if he were the first elimination his ranking would be tenth. After the tournament is over, the champion would face the number one contender at a later date, and the rest of the wrestlers would fight each other to climb the rankings. Furthermore, if a new person wants to enter the mix, he must beat all ten wrestlers to get a shot. On the other hand, if the company isn’t committed to the idea it should be scrapped.

Yoel Romero Is A Horrible Stylistic Match Up For Robert Whittaker

Earlier this week, The UFC announced that Yoel Romero is going to face Robert Whittaker for the interim middleweight title at UFC 213. This announcement generated a substantial amount of buzz among hardcore fans as well as the media because the fight is believed to be a close contest. However one can argue that Romero is a horrible stylistic matchup for Whittaker; thus it won’t be close. This is because, throughout his UFC career, Robert Whittaker has shown a tendency to regularly throw or faint the left jab in an attempt to get the opponent to block the punch. If the opponent decides to stand still and prevents the combination, it gives him a small window of opportunity to close the distance and land power punches. During the small window, he will repeatedly throw an overhand or straight left/right with intentions of knocking out or severely hurting the opposition. However, this strategy can put him in real danger because Whittaker has a habit of twisting his body or leaning to the side while throwing power punches.  As a result, he ends up being off balance after throwing the punch, which leaves him vulnerable to a takedown or a counter.

Therefore, Robert Whittaker’s fighting style should cost him the fight against Yoel Romero. This is because Romero can exploit Robert’s habit of twisting his body or leaning to the side while throwing power punches in several different ways. For example, if Romero senses that Whittaker is about to throw a power punch, he can slide out of striking range or duck under the punch to avoid getting hit. As a result, Whittaker should be off balance, which gives Romero a chance to shoot for a takedown. On the other hand, Romero can circle out to the right when Whittaker is about to throw a punch and counter with a straight left.