The Ducking Game: Boxer Vs Promoter

Introduction- Ali Act

Over the last couple of decades, the boxing community has routinely placed the blame on boxers for not booking big fights promptly. A perfect example of this is when members of the boxing community accused Saul “Canelo” Alverez of ducking Gennady Golovkin because he waited several years to make the fight. For instance, Liam Smith, a former opponent of Alverez told ESPN in 2016 that Canelo made the right decision in ducking the fight because he wasn’t “big enough.” However, the boxing community should spread the blame evenly among the boxer and promoter for not making big fights in a timely manner. This is because the United Government enacted a federal law called the Muhammad Ali Boxing Reform Act on May 26th, 2000. According to Boxing Insider, the Ali act was put in place “to protect the rights and welfare of professional boxers… to promote honorable competition in professional boxing”.

Boxer Vs Promoter

Due to this, if a boxer chooses to hire a manager and promoter, he or she must split the role between two people due to a conflict of interest with both roles. A boxing manager is hired to represent the interests of a boxer during contract negotiations with a promoter. For example, a manager informs the promoter when the boxer is available to fight and what amount of compensation he wants for the fight. On the other hand, the promoter wants to maximize profits for every contracted fight. For example, a promoter will often attempt to lower the boxer’s compensation during negotiations with a manager to maximize profits. As a result of this, there are several factors taken into consideration when it comes to making a fight. A boxer must determine if he is interested in taking the fight, ready to face the opponent and see the amount of compensation he is getting for the match. Once the boxer evaluates all these factors, he will give an answer to his manager who will relay it to the promoter. On the other hand, the promoter will assess the compensation his client is asking for, what kind of money the fight can generate and whether his client has an easy path to victory. If the opponent can check all the boxes for the boxer and promoter, the fight will be made. On the other hand, if the fighter and promoter disagree, the contest will be taken off the table or delayed until it checks the boxes for both parties.

Anthony Joshua Vs The Hearn Family

A perfect example of this is the battle between Anthony Joshua and Eddie Hearn on when is the right time to accept a bout with Deontay Wilder. During an interview with IFL TV on April 13th, Joshua stated that he would take the fight tomorrow if he were given a guaranteed purse of 50 million dollars. Twelve days later, Deontay released a video on all his social media platforms stating that he managed to gather the money and sent an offer to his team. Later that day, Anthony responded to the video in Deontay Wilder’s Instagram comments by saying lets roll. Unfortunately, Anthony Joshua has yet to formally accept the bout because Eddie Hearn and his father don’t think it is the right time for the match. According to the Daily Mail, Barry Hearn told Joshua that if he had about six months to live he should fight him. However, “if you’re saying to me that you’ve got a legacy plan then I’m saying let’s capitalise on it properly.”

How To Beat Vasyl Lomachenko

Vasyl Lomachenko’s Fighting Style

Throughout his boxing career, Vasyl Lomachenko has shown a tendency to walk down his opponents in an attempt to get them inside striking range. If he is successful, Vasyl will use a combination of head feints and right jabs to get his lead right foot around the opponent’s lead foot to eliminate the small space between them. Assuming he can achieve the goal, Lomachenko will throw the right jab followed by either the straight left or right uppercut to the head. However, if he can’t accomplish the goal, Vasyl will pivot into the lead hand of the opponent to get his lead right foot around the opponent’s lead foot to eliminate the small space between them. The pivot gives Lomachenko a wide-open angle to land the right jab followed by either the straight left, right uppercut or left a hook to the head without being countered. After this happens, the opponent is forced to raise his hands to block Vasyl’s punches which opens the door for him to attack the body with a straight left or hooks.

How To Beat Vasyl Lomachenko

However, one can argue that Vasyl Lomachenko’s fighting style will be the catalyst for his second loss. This is because Vasyl will linger in in the pocket for a couple of seconds after throwing a combination with his hands positioned at or above the jawline. Due to this, Lomachenko is continuously giving his opponents a small window to land punches to the body without resistance. As a result of this, when he lingers in the pocket, the opponent should either throw a couple of punches aimed at the body or extend his arms to get a clinch and then attack the body. After this happens, the opponent should either cover up or slightly slide back to avoid much damage until Vasyl is done. When Lomachenko is finished with the combination, the opponent should restart the process of attacking the body.  If the opponent can successfully implement the game plan for the first half of the fight, Vasyl should become more of a stationary target in the latter half. As a result, he should have the opportunity to stand his ground and throw more power punches.

 

How To Beat Keith Thurman

Throughout his boxing career, Keith Thurman has shown a tendency to walk down his opponents in an attempt to get them inside striking range. If he is successful, Keith will pay attention to the hand placement of the opponent to determine the next course of action. For instance, if the opponent places the hands at jaw level or higher, Keith will target the body by either throwing the left jab followed by the straight right hand or left and right hooks. This is because the opponent usually can’t drop his fists in time to block or deflect the strike. On the other hand, if the opponent places the hands below the jaw, Thurman will target the head with the same mixture of punches. After he figures out the hand placement of the opponent, Keith will leap or extend his body forward to eliminate the small space between he and his rival. If he can achieve that objective, Keith Thurman will attack the open area on his opponent’s body. On the other hand, if the opponent can time when Thurman is about to leap or extend forward, he can slide back causing Keith to swing wide and leave himself open for a counter.

However, one can argue that Keith Thurman’s fighting style will be the catalyst for his first loss. This is because every time he moves forward to close the distance, Keith maintains his hands at or about jaw-level for the majority of the time he is in the ring. Due to this, Thurman is continuously giving his opponents an opportunity to land punches to the body without resistance. As a result of this, when Keith Thurman comes forward, his opponent should look to duck under the jab and throw one or two punches to the body. Once the opponent is done, he should circle out of striking range in either direction. The game plan should force Keith to regularly reset and slowly drain him of energy. If the opponent can successfully implement the game plan for the first half of the fight, Keith should become more of a stationary target in the latter half. As a result, he should have the opportunity to stand his ground and throw more power punches.

How To Beat Gennady Golovkin

Throughout his boxing career, Gennady Golovkin has shown a tendency to walk down his opponents until they are within striking range. If he is successful, Golovkin will repeatedly throw the left jab until he can get his lead left foot around the opponent’s lead foot to eliminate the small space between them. Unfortunately, when Gennady throws the punch, most of the opponents will slide out of range to avoid getting hit with the strike. Eventually, these fighters find themselves near or up against the ring ropes with little room to maneuver. Once this happens, Gennady Golovkin will pay attention to the hand placement of the opponent to determine the next course of action. For instance, if the opponent places the hands at jaw level or higher,  Golovkin will target the body by repeatedly throwing left and right hooks. This is because the opponent usually can’t drop his fists in time to block or deflect the strike. On the other hand, if the opponent places the hands below the jaw, Gennady will target the head by throwing overhand rights or left and right hooks.

However, one can argue that the recipe to defeat Gennady Golovkin is to stand your ground within the pocket. When an opponent chooses to stand in the pocket with him, Golovkin usually shells up for a couple of seconds in hopes that they start using movement again. This is because Gennady is used to the opponents trying to avoid his punches that he hasn’t developed a strategy for when they stay in the pocket. As a result of this, the opponent has a small window of opportunity to string some punches together without having to worry about being countered. For instance, Kell Brook had some success in the second round against Gennady Golovkin because he remained in the pocket which forced triple G to cover up. Once this happened,  Kell landed a left jab, hook, and uppercut as well as a right hook. Another example of this is the Daniel Jacobs fight, Jacobs decided to stay in the pocket for the second half of the bout. During these rounds, Daniel landed a substantial amount of hooks to the head and body because Golovkin was just covering up.